CERN Accelerating science

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Gian Giudice's TEDxCERN is the talk of the day at TED.com

The biggest surprise of discovering the Higgs boson? That there were no surprises. Gian Giudice talks us through a problem in theoretical physics: what if the Higgs field exists in an ultra-dense state that could mean the collapse of all atomic matter? With wit and charm, Giudice outlines a grim fate -- and why we shouldn't start worrying just yet. (Filmed at TEDxCERN.)

John's Searle talk at TED.com

After only 6 hours of being posted at TED.com, John Searle's TEDxCERN talk has been seen by more than 30,000 people!

John describes how "consciousness is the most important aspect of our lives and yet a neglected subject in our scientific and philosophical culture". He goes further to say that, "[Consciousness] is the most important aspect of our lives... It's a necessary condition to anything being important in our lives. If you care about science, philosophy, music, art, whatever, it's no good if you are a zombie or in a coma."

Multiplying Dimensions

Multiplying dimensions

A few weeks ago, I had a vague notion of what TED was, and how it worked, but now I’m a confirmed fan. It was my privilege to host CERN’s first TEDx event last Friday, and I can honestly say that I can’t remember a time when I was exposed to so much brilliance in such a short time.

Review of Session Three

« An adventure in perception in mutliple dimensions »

Wow. Session Three, how good was that?! After George Smoot’s overview of the Standard Model and the next stages for particle physics brought the CERN audiences back from the break, Tara Shears introduced the final session of talks.

Review of Session Two

“Robots are stupid, but people need coffee”

Earlier this afternoon, a brief coffee break provided the audiences at CERN with a chance to mull over the ideas presented by the first session of talks. In the Auditorium and online, the second session of talks was preceded by a live Q&A between Tara Shears and Chris Lintott, looking into the roles of people, computers and robots in the future of science.

Review of Session One

crowd at TEDxCERN auditorium

“Being smarter at using people’s attention.”

What a start to TEDxCERN!

Let’s take stock at the end of Session One. Between Hiranya Peiris’ account of the biggest “Whodunnit” detective story in the Universe, to Marc Abrahams’ tales of the most improbable research around, there has been plenty to think about so far.

Today's the day!

Physics, engineering, computing… day-to-day life here at CERN already runs in several dimensions. But today, we go beyond our usual business as we host TEDxCERN, bringing together some of the brightest minds from a range of disciplines under the theme of “multiplying dimensions”.

The oldest light in the universe

Hiranya Peiris, is one of the planck  team, + winner of the 2012 RAS Fowler Prize. She studies the oldest light we can see in the universe in order to understand the why and how of the Big Bang. Hiranya will talk about Origins of the Early Universe at TEDxCERN!

You are never too young to be a research scientist

Becky Parker MBE, Head of Physics at Simon Langton Grammar School, winner of the first RAS Patrick Moore Medal for her outstanding work teaching astronomy, has pupils who make up 1% of the national cohort of physics undergraduates in the UK. How? Find out at TEDxCERN!

Lee Cronin on revolutionizing modern technology

Lee Cronin investigates how chemistry can revolutionize modern technology, his lab has created a 3D printer for molecules and even has a bold plan to make matter come alive with forms of non-biological life! He will be discussing his 'Apollo Project' for chemistry at TEDxCERN!

18-year-old Brittany Wenger on her Research and Inspiration

Brittany Wenger, 18, high school senior, brilliant young scientist and Grand Prize Winner 2012 Google Science Fair, for her project “Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.”  She will talk about how she came to science, her 'Research and Inspiration', at TEDxCERN!

Zehra Sayers on a project many thought impossible

Zehra Sayers is the the chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee for “an impossible project”: SESAME. Scientists from the Middle East, working together to establish a world class research laboratory using only the language of science. 

Ian Foster's take on Big Data

Ian Foster’s research for high performance distributed and parallel computing has many call him ‘father of grid computing’. Ian will take us on a journey of Big Process for Big Data, with a call to action for the kind of collaborative processes we need. Stay tuned for more at TEDxCERN!

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